Celebrating Life On Day of The Dead!
Whether in Oaxaca, Michoacán, Puebla or Mexico City, do not miss this celebration full of tradition and meaning

TRADITIONS OF MEXICO

The Day of the Dead Tradition takes place on November the 1st and 2nd of November

 

The Day of the Dead, also known as Night of the Dead, is one of the most important festivities and with more tradition that takes place in our country. On this holiday, Mexicans remember and honor their deceased loved ones. It's not a gloomy or morbid occasion, rather it is a festive and colorful holiday celebrating the lives of those who have passed on. 

The origins of the day of the dead date back to long before the Spanish conquest, but today it's a fussion of Mexican culture with the European; With the arrival of the   Spaniards 

"The Day of the Dead, is one of the most important festivities and with more tradition that takes place in our country." 

The offering that is mounted on an altar of different levels, the first two days of November, constitutes a homage to the deceased who visits to the relatives at this time. It is composed, among other things, of the typical bread of the dead, the pumpkin in sweet of strikeout and dishes of the Mexican cuisine that in life were of the pleasure of the deceased. Ornaments are also used as the characteristics of marigolds flowers, chopped paper, candles, sugar skulls and copal incense.

The importance of the Day of the Dead in Mexico makes cities, towns and houses full of altars dedicated to the deceased who return these days to live with their relatives who are still alive. However, there are places that are distinguished by keeping this tradition so full of mysticism very vivid. Such is the case of Pátzcuaro, the magical town of Michoacán, which is located 30 minutes from the city of Morelia, where the most important and representative celebration takes place in Janitzio, one of the islands, and the largest, of Lake Pátzcuaro. This celebration attracts visitors from all over the world. In addition to religious offerings and rituals, there are exhibitions, concerts, displays, workshops, cultural tours and gastronomic exhibits.

"In Aztec Days  the festivities were presided over by the goddess Mictecacíhuatl, known as the "Lady of Death", currently related to "La Catrina".
Day of the Dead
Day of the Dead

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Day of the Dead
Day of the Dead

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also arrives the Christianity that introduces to the celebration and to the alteres images of saints, crosses and some fruits that did not exist in America. According to the Catholic calendar, the first day of November is dedicated to All Saints and day two to the faithful deceased. According to the people's belief, the first is dedicated to the "small dead", those who died as children, and the second to the deceased in adulthood.

The festival in antiquity was commemorated the ninth month of the Aztec solar calendar, and was held for almost two months. The festivities were presided over by the goddess Mictecacíhuatl, known as the "Lady of Death", currently related to "La Catrina". The festivities were dedicated to the celebration of the lives of deceased relatives, celebrating first the children and then the adults.

"The Day of the Dead is not a gloomy or morbid occasion, rather it is a festive and colorful holiday celebrating the lives of those who have passed on."
Day Of The Death Parade
Day Of The Death Parade

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Day Of The Death Parade
Day Of The Death Parade

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Day Of The Death Parade
Day Of The Death Parade

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The beauty and magic that surrounds the Day of the Dead have made this tradition recognized by UNESCO as an intangible Cultural heritage of humanity since November 2003.

Mexico City has not been spared to this tradition and since the year 2016 celebrates it with a parade that summons a multitude of people and is held in the heart of the city, in addition to a great offering and the realization of artistic and cultural activities. 

 

We trully expect that you will come to celebrate with Us this year!

Sources: Adapted from an article of www.morelianas.com and http://data.cultura.cdmx.gob.mx/celebraciondemuertos/  October 2018 

Published by DMS de México All rights rserved 2022