Celebrating The Day of The Dead in Mexico City!
Do not miss this celebration full of tradition and meaning

TRADITIONS OF MEXICO

This year the Day of the Dead Parade in Mexico City will be held on Saturday, October 29 at noon

 

What is Day of The Dead?

The roots of the Day of the Dead go back some 3,000 years, to the rituals honoring the dead in pre-hispanic Mesoamerica. The Aztecs held a cyclical view of the universe, and saw death as an integral, ever-present part of life.

 

Day of the Dead is not a somber affair in Mexico — since the Aztec era, it has always been a lively celebration to honor the deceased. Today, Dia de Muertos is a blend of Mesoamerican ritual, European religion and Spanish culture. It’s definitely not the “Mexican version of Halloween.” 

The holiday was even added to UNESCO’s list of Intangible Cultural Heritage as “a defining aspect of Mexican culture.” 

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Day Of The Dead Parade
Day Of The Dead Parade

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Day Of The Dead Parade
Day Of The Dead Parade

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"Day of the Dead is not a somber affair in Mexico - since the Aztec era, it has always been a lively celebration to honor the deceased."

How is Dia de Muertos celebrated?

Traditionally, the Day of the Dead has always been a family affair. Families erect ofrendas (altar offerings) to honor their deceased family members. They then decorate the altar with candles, opal incense, marigold flowers, photos of the departed, and the favorite foods and drinks. 

These days, the celebrations have evolved over time but they’re still centered on Mexican traditions. Museums display massive ofrendas, squares and avenues are lined with colorful alebrijes (mythical creatures) and calaveras (skulls), while every shop and restaurant is decorated with papel picado (paper flags). 

On the streets, you’ll see many people dressed as La Catrina, with beautiful face paint and floral headbands. Get your face painted, put on a flower head-band, and prepare for one hell of a party!

Day Of The Dead in Mexico City

In Mexico City, Día de los Muertos can be a week-long affair. In past years, the highlight of the capital’s festivities was arguably its parade, the Desfile de Día de Muertos, which was first held in 2016 and inspired by the opening scene of the James Bond film Spectre, which features a crowded procession in the city’s streets. 

Usually, though, thousands of people gather in Mexico City’s Plaza del Zócalo to watch performers parade around dressed as colorful alebrijes (mythical creatures) or the elegant La Calavera Catrina. On the outskirts of the capital in the southern Xochimilco neighborhood, decorated canals and chinampas (floating gardens) set the scene for special night Día de los Muertos rides by trajinera (gondola boat) on November 1.

Mexico City will hold two parades and a mega offering in the Zocalo for Day of the Dead this year. 

"The highlight of the capital’s festivities is arguably its parade, the Desfile de Día de Muertos, which was first held in 2016 and inspired by the opening scene of the James Bond film Spectre."
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We trully expect that you will come to celebrate with Us this year! Contact Us!

The Dia de Muertos holiday in Mexico is a real tourist sensation so hotel reservations and activities are quickly covered. If you want to plan your group for 2023 we are already working on it!

Sources: Adapted from  https://mexicotravel.blog/day-of-the-dead-in-mexico-city/  & https://www.milenio.com/politica/cdmx-realizara-desfiles-mega-ofrenda-zocalo-dia-muertos-2022

Published by DMS de México All rights rserved 2022